Composite materials

Grâce-Hollogne
R&D Manager Health, Safety & Security
Centexbel's concept for a biobased self-reinforced composite material receives the prestigious JEC World Innovation Award in the category “Sustainability”
The CELFI trajectory aims to efficiently develop, produce, apply and recylce WPC (Wood Plastic Composites), the most important product group in the family of plastics reinforced by CELlulosic FIbres.
This Interreg 2 Seas-Mers-Zeeën project will develop biobased composites for applications in a marine environment in answer to the growing markets for fish & seaweed farming, energy harvesting, boats, pontons, anchoring and buoy elements.
With a length of 42 m, the new bicycle and footbridge are the longest composite bridges made of one piece in the world. Even longer than the average Boeing (35 m).
MACOBIO is part of the project cluster FEDER 2014-2020 - Low Carbon Footprint Materials - addressing the validation of natural resources for the production of novel biobased materials. MACOBIO is aimed at the design of 100% biobased composite materials, including innovative thermoplastic and thermoset biobased matrixes, reinforced with natural fibres.
On 2 & 3 October 2018, more than 100 participants from Belgium and abroad gathered at the Park Inn Hotel in Liège Airport to attend the 2018 international conference on COMPOSITES. The conference was organised by CENTEXBEL, the Textiles Competence Centre, and provided a platform to the participants form the industry and research world to discuss the exceptional characteristics of these new materials and to highlight the challenges of their production.
The aim of the project is to develop sustainable fibre reinforced composites that meet the flame retardancy requirements of the transport and construction sectors, meaning that the materials are difficult to ignite, have no burning droplets and have low smoke densities and toxicities.
Comp2blades aims to develop a hightech blade and an innovative production process for small windmills with vertical axes
The LIBRE project will utilise lignin-rich side stream feedstock from the pulp and paper industry, blended with a biopolymer precursor fibre, to create a more resource-efficient and sustainable carbon fibre production process.